News & Politics

Stephen Colbert Bids a Fond Farewell to 'Dummy' Michael Flynn

"He just wanted to spend more time with his Russian contacts."

Photo Credit: The Late Show/YouTube

Remember when Trump said that when he became president, we'd all get tired of winning? Stephen Colbert sure does.

"The Trump administration is going great," he deadpanned Wednesday before devoting the night's "Late Show" to former national security adviser Michael Flynn's resignation the day prior. 

"Man who doesn't see what's so damn funny... [Flynn] resigned last night, not because of a scandal, he just wanted to spend more time with his Russian contacts," Colbert joked. "But Flynn leaves behind a distinguished legacy of the shortest tenure in history."

Flynn served as White House national security adviser for just 24 days. The "Late Show" host broke down exactly where he went wrong.

"Here's what happened: After Barack Obama imposed sanctions on Russia for messing with our election, Flynn called the Russian ambassador, discussed the sanctions and allegedly signaled the Kremlin to expect a reprieve when Trump took office," Colbert explained.

"And if that wasn't signal enough, they got the hint when Trump signed his first executive order," Colbert joked, showing a photoshopped image of President Trump holding a V-Day card for Russian President Vladimir Putin.

"Now, at first, Flynn denied all of this," Colbert continued. "But he got caught, because, it turns out, we listen in on every phone call with the Russian ambassador. Who knew? Evidently not the national security advisor, you dummy!”

“It’s funny because it’s treason," he offered, wistfully.

Watch:

Alexandra Rosenmann is an AlterNet associate editor. Follow her @alexpreditor.

Stay Ahead of the Rest
Sign Up for AlterNet's Daily Newsletter
+ sign up for additional lists
[x]
Select additional lists by selecting the checkboxes below before clicking Subscribe:
Rights & Liberties
Education
Drugs
Economy
Environment
Labor
Food
World
Politics
Investigation
Personal Health
Water
Media